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Energy efficiency can reduce environmental costs, economic and social issues related to the production and consumption of energy.This is an important element

OF ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE FIGHT AGAINST GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.THE EUROPEAN DIRECTIVE (MAY 19, 2010) ON THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS REQUIRES THAT BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTED AFTER 2020 WILL HAVE TO APPROACH THE ENERGY "ALMOST ZERO" STANDARD IN 2020. THE NEW DIRECTIVE (OCTOBER 25, 2012) SPECIFIES THE ACTIONS TO BE TAKEN FROM THE MEMBER STATES: “BUILDINGS ARE ESSENTIAL FOR ACHIEVING THE EU OBJECTIVE TO REDUCE EMISSIONS OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY 80-95% BY 2050 COMPARED TO 1990.”

The construction sector is one of the largest consumers of energy among all economic sectors (40%). Building and installation companies, as well as building owners need to comply with new European energy regulations mentioned above to reduce the energy consumption.

Training providers face the challenge to keep up with the fast going developments in the building industry. Firstly, training programmes need to adapt to the constantly changing regulations regarding energy efficiency in buildings, starting from the European of Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD, 2012/27/EU). Secondly, technological innovations to make buildings more energy efficient are being developed at high speed.

Furthermore, the sector changes from separate identities such as the architect, the builder contractor, the electrician, the plumber, etc. to bigger building teams who are again internally divided into specialized divisions. This evolution in the building construction requires a different professional structure of the sector, to which the training programmes need to be adapted to provide the people for this structure. On the one hand, the current education programmes are organised per specific profession that deals with a specific part of the building. There is a growing need for more interaction in order to bring down the energy consumption of a building. On the other hand, there is a growing demand for an overview of these various disciplines in order to come to a real energy management system for buildings.

For vocational teachers and trainers in this sector it is difficult to cope with the constant change. A common European professional structure for energy management in buildings should be developed for the VET system to be able to reply to the on-going evolution and the requirements from the EPBD.”